Temperature rising over future hosting of Olympics

The Rio Olympic Games will no doubt be remembered for its stories of individual triumph.
Nanjing Night Net

Mack Horton seizing Australia’s first gold, and Michael Phelps finishing his career with 23 gold medals are already the stuff of sporting legend.

But for me Rio’s greatest accomplishment was away from the sporting field. Brazil’s decision to use the opening ceremony to alert sports loversof all cultures and faithsto the threat of climate change is proof humanity is awakening to the need for urgent action.

Brazil, like Australia, is feeling the heat. Our rural and regional communities are disproportionately affected by climate change due to worsening heatwaves, droughts, and bushfires.

If we continue on our current path, by the end of the century climate change will generate unprecedented social disorganisation, conflict, and famine that will harm billions of people.

A New Zealand study has found most cities will be too hot to host Summer Olympics within decades. Canadian researchers say if we fail to limit carbon pollution, two in three cities that previously hosted Winter Olympics will not be cold enough to do it again.

What’soften overlooked is how important religion is for many athletes, like US gymnastSimone Biles, to achieve the ‘impossible’. Faith, like the Olympics, can also inspire hope and unite communities to tackle climate change.

With four in five Australians identifying as religious, faith groups and people of conscience must work together to break the record most critical to the well-being of our children, and ensuring the Olympics are run well into the future – a rapid transition to 100% renewable energy.

Jody Lightfoot, climate change lead at Christian justice group, Common Grace, and Dr Colin Butler, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Contributor and co-founder of BODHI Australia

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Hunter Valley hearts need a healthier focus

There’s no reason to celebrate the Hunter’s inclusion in this top five list.
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According to new data released by the Heart Foundation, the Hunter Valley had the fourth highest heart-related hospital admissions in NSW during a study that took place for two years up to mid-2014.

The study investigated the number of hospital admissions that resulted in either transfer, discharge, change in care or deathacross Australia in relation to heart failure, heart attacks and unstable angina.

In NSW, the Hunter was beaten only by the Riverina,Far West and Orana and Blacktown.

The figures showed that, compared with a state average of 44.8, the Hunter recorded a rate of 69.9 admissions per 10,000 people.

It may have taken some time for these figures to have been released, but they should serve as a warning that Hunter residents need to pick up the pace when it comes to building healthy lifestyles.

The results have been loaded onto an online, interactive map so the areas most at-risk of heart disease can easily be identified and helped.

For the Hunter, in particular, that’s a goodthing.

Heart Foundation NSW CEO Kerry Doyle said regional townsgenerally had poorer health outcomes, partly because of lifestyle risk factors.

She said residents of regional areas were “significantly more likely to have high blood pressure, smoke andbe obese”.

The Heart Foundation, a charity aimed at promoting awareness of and reducing heart disease, has a range of easily accessibleinitiatives to help peoplemaketheir lives healthier.

Ms Doyle saidthe CessnockHealthy Lifestyle Network and Jump Rope For Heart Outreach were among the useful programs available in the Hunter.

“We need to make sure we keep supporting the communities that are not doing so well toensure they can take some simple steps to improve their heart health – stop smoking, be moreactive and get a heart health check to understand your risk,” she said.

While organisations like the Heart Foundation are helpful and do good work for communities, ultimately it’s each individual’s responsibility to make lifestyle changes where necessary.

That’s the only way we can avoid being so highly ranked on lists like this in future.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Southern Highlands Cookbook launch: PHOTOS

Southern Highlands Cookbook launch: PHOTOS John Shelly, Chris Harvey, Sally Beresford, Stefan Posthuma, Richard Kemp and Mark Stone celebrate the launch of The Southern Highlands Cookbook at Berida Manor on Sunday. Photo by Josh Bartlett
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Julie Halse, Werner Bayer and Shirley Meredith flick through The Southern Highlands Cookbook. Photo by Josh Bartlett

Catriona Shaw and Nicole De Graaf sell books on Sunday at Berida Manor. Photo by Josh Bartlett

Heaton Whitcombe, Charlie Butler and Andy Reid catch up at Sunday’s event. Photo by Josh Bartlett

Emma McMahon and Stacy Spargo unwind at the launch on Sunday. Photo by Josh Bartlett

Amy Woods and Margot Reid relax at Sunday’s book launch. Photo by Josh Bartlett

Cressida McNamara and Alex Coccia catch up at Sunday’s launch. Photo by Josh Bartlett

Lisa Kawai and Eloise Haydon toast the launch of the book on Sunday. Photo by Josh Bartlett

Nicola Krejci and Jane Bollom at Sunday’s event. Photo by Josh Bartlett

Claudia Stahl and Andrew Rode at the book launch. Photo by Josh Bartlett

TweetFacebookA large crowd of people attended theofficiallaunch ofThe Southern Highlands Cookbook at Berida House.

Released through Quicksand Food, the book features 30 chefs and producers from the Highlands.

Businesses and producers featured include Biota Dining, Mauger’s Meats, Stones Patiserie and Li-Sun Exotic Mushrooms.

Publisher Stefan Posthuma said the book aimed to showcase the diversity of food in the Southern Highlands.

Mr Posthuma said the book was released in the Highlands on Wednesday.

“We’ve had a great reception,” he said.

“The book has brought 30 chefs and producers from across the region together.

“It provides an insight into food in the Southern Highlands.”

The Southern Highlands Cookbook contributors:

McGitty GoveRedleaf FarmPeroca DairyHighlands Gourmet ProducersMoonacres FarmMauger’s MeatsSutton Forest OlivesLa Palette Cafe, Mount Ashby EstateBernie’s DinerKaters Restaurant, Pepper’s Manor HouseExeter General StoreRockabellas Roadside DinerTwo Country CooksBurrawang General StoreThe Shaggy CowCerdo Food and WinePhatt Duck at the Old BankPhatt Duck at the Fitzroy InnStones PatiserieEschalotBendooley EstateBiota DiningFlour, Water, SaltLudo. CafeOnesta CucinaYelverton TrufflesLi-Sun Exotic MushroomsBistro OfficinaBurrawang General StoreMontrose Berry Farm1910 Bottling Company.This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Temperature rising over future hosting of Olympics

The Rio Olympic Games will no doubt be remembered for its stories of individual triumph.
Nanjing Night Net

Mack Horton seizing Australia’s first gold, and Michael Phelps finishing his career with 23 gold medals are already the stuff of sporting legend.

But for me Rio’s greatest accomplishment was away from the sporting field. Brazil’s decision to use the opening ceremony to alert sports loversof all cultures and faithsto the threat of climate change is proof humanity is awakening to the need for urgent action.

Brazil, like Australia, is feeling the heat. Our rural and regional communities are disproportionately affected by climate change due to worsening heatwaves, droughts, and bushfires.

If we continue on our current path, by the end of the century climate change will generate unprecedented social disorganisation, conflict, and famine that will harm billions of people.

A New Zealand study has found most cities will be too hot to host Summer Olympics within decades. Canadian researchers say if we fail to limit carbon pollution, two in three cities that previously hosted Winter Olympics will not be cold enough to do it again.

What’soften overlooked is how important religion is for many athletes, like US gymnastSimone Biles, to achieve the ‘impossible’. Faith, like the Olympics, can also inspire hope and unite communities to tackle climate change.

With four in five Australians identifying as religious, faith groups and people of conscience must work together to break the record most critical to the well-being of our children, and ensuring the Olympics are run well into the future – a rapid transition to 100% renewable energy.

Jody Lightfoot, climate change lead at Christian justice group, Common Grace, and Dr Colin Butler, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Contributor and co-founder of BODHI Australia

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Family says thanks for generosity

FAMILY TRAGEDY: Adrian Heber, 33, with his partner Chantelle Brown and their five daughters and step-daughters. Picture: ADVANCEDLIFE STUDIOS
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SUPPORT is growing for a Lavington family, which was left devastated following a fatal industrial accident last week.

Chantelle Brown, who is 17-weeks pregnant, was grief-stricken in the wake of her 33-year-old partner’s death.

Adrian Heberwas killed onsite at Wodonga steel fabrication companySJ andTA Structural about 7amThursday.

An online fundraiser has been established for MsBrownand the couple’scombined five daughters and step-daughters.

Ms Brown’s sister, Ang Godden, said the pair had been together more than three years.

“It is really hard seeing her go through all this, but all of our family and friends have been so supportive,” Mrs Godden said.

“Adrian was amazing, he was the best dad and step-dadand loved all the children with everything he had.

“Ithought it would be really helpful to create a fundraiser.

“In circumstances like this, money doesn’t help with the grief and the pain, but it eases the burden a little bit.”

DEVASTATED: Lavington father Adrian Heber, 33, was killed onsite at Wodonga steel fabrication company SJ and TA Structural on Thursday. Support is growing for his family.

Ms Brown looked down through tears at a picture of Adrian, whose absence was too soon and sudden for the young family.Mrs Godden said the newswas both difficult and unexpected.

“Chantelle is devastated,as you’d expect,” she said.

“She isa bit lost and doesn’t know what she’s going to do.

“She’s always had him as her best friend,to reassure her in times like this.

“He’s always been the one to say everything is OKand that thingswill get better, but she was telling me how he’s not here to say that now.”

The fundraiser has hit$2000 in two days, which will go towards funeral costs and preparing for the new baby.Mrs Godden said her sister had been “overwhelmed” by the support.

“It’s absolutely amazing,” she said.

“Chantelle just thinks it’s so nice, she didn’t realise so many people would be so generous in times like this.

“I just want to thank everybody for their support and loving kind words at this time.”

Support the family atgofundme南京夜网/2khag7wx

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Temperature rising over future hosting of Olympics

The Rio Olympic Games will no doubt be remembered for its stories of individual triumph.
Nanjing Night Net

Mack Horton seizing Australia’s first gold, and Michael Phelps finishing his career with 23 gold medals are already the stuff of sporting legend.

But for me Rio’s greatest accomplishment was away from the sporting field. Brazil’s decision to use the opening ceremony to alert sports loversof all cultures and faithsto the threat of climate change is proof humanity is awakening to the need for urgent action.

Brazil, like Australia, is feeling the heat. Our rural and regional communities are disproportionately affected by climate change due to worsening heatwaves, droughts, and bushfires.

If we continue on our current path, by the end of the century climate change will generate unprecedented social disorganisation, conflict, and famine that will harm billions of people.

A New Zealand study has found most cities will be too hot to host Summer Olympics within decades. Canadian researchers say if we fail to limit carbon pollution, two in three cities that previously hosted Winter Olympics will not be cold enough to do it again.

What’soften overlooked is how important religion is for many athletes, like US gymnastSimone Biles, to achieve the ‘impossible’. Faith, like the Olympics, can also inspire hope and unite communities to tackle climate change.

With four in five Australians identifying as religious, faith groups and people of conscience must work together to break the record most critical to the well-being of our children, and ensuring the Olympics are run well into the future – a rapid transition to 100% renewable energy.

Jody Lightfoot, climate change lead at Christian justice group, Common Grace, and Dr Colin Butler, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Contributor and co-founder of BODHI Australia

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Temperature rising over future hosting of Olympics

The Rio Olympic Games will no doubt be remembered for its stories of individual triumph.
Nanjing Night Net

Mack Horton seizing Australia’s first gold, and Michael Phelps finishing his career with 23 gold medals are already the stuff of sporting legend.

But for me Rio’s greatest accomplishment was away from the sporting field. Brazil’s decision to use the opening ceremony to alert sports loversof all cultures and faithsto the threat of climate change is proof humanity is awakening to the need for urgent action.

Brazil, like Australia, is feeling the heat. Our rural and regional communities are disproportionately affected by climate change due to worsening heatwaves, droughts, and bushfires.

If we continue on our current path, by the end of the century climate change will generate unprecedented social disorganisation, conflict, and famine that will harm billions of people.

A New Zealand study has found most cities will be too hot to host Summer Olympics within decades. Canadian researchers say if we fail to limit carbon pollution, two in three cities that previously hosted Winter Olympics will not be cold enough to do it again.

What’soften overlooked is how important religion is for many athletes, like US gymnastSimone Biles, to achieve the ‘impossible’. Faith, like the Olympics, can also inspire hope and unite communities to tackle climate change.

With four in five Australians identifying as religious, faith groups and people of conscience must work together to break the record most critical to the well-being of our children, and ensuring the Olympics are run well into the future – a rapid transition to 100% renewable energy.

Jody Lightfoot, climate change lead at Christian justice group, Common Grace, and Dr Colin Butler, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Contributor and co-founder of BODHI Australia

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Serious collision between car and truck in Rokewood

UPDATE
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A person has died in a serious collision on the Rokewood-Skipton Road this afternoon.

All emergency services were called to a collision between a car and a truck just after 3.30pm.

Police media officerLeading Senior Constable Julie-Anne Newman said the driver of the car, who has not been formally identified, died at the scene.

Ambulance Victoria Spokesman John Mullen said the driver of the truck was being treated by paramedics for minor injuries at the scene of the collision.

Earlier, a CFA media spokeswoman said eight CFA trucks were on the scene of the head-on accident.

VicRoads have advised motorists to avoid the area with traffic diversions in place.

The death takes the 2016 road toll to 196 compared to 169this time last year.

EARLIER

All emergency services are on the scene of a serious collision between a car and truck near Rokewood.

A CFA media spokeswoman confirmedeight CFA units had responded to the head collision on the Skipton-Rokewood Road in Rokewood.

15:38 Rokewood-skipton Rd, Rokewood – Rescue going (CFA district 15) #rescuehttps://t.co/2tbLyXCaMM

— Incident Alert – D15 (@IncidentAlert15) August 21, 2016Rokewood-Skipton Rd (C143), Rokewood – Traffic Alert, Rokewood-Skipton Rd near Mill Rd . Serious… https://t.co/I3O6YIqIH4#victraffic

— VicRoads (@VicRoads) August 21, 2016This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Letters to the Editor

Turned awayApart from the horror story of what criminal intruders did to Mr Scott Riley’s puppies (Advocate, August 19), the veterinarians whom Mr Riley contacted for assistance for the brutally attacked and dying Molly and who turned him away because he did not have the money needed should be ashamed of themselves.
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Searching: Suzanne Cass is concerned that dog owner Scott Riley had to search for help from a vet for his injured puppy after an attack last week.

What sort of veterinarian turns away a desperately suffering and dying animal?

I believe that they should re-acquaint themselves with the Veterinary Surgeon’s Oath, which states: “Being admitted to the profession of Veterinary medicine, I solemnly swear to use my scientific knowledge and skills for the benefit of society through the protection of animal health, the relief of animal suffering, the conservation of livestock resources, the promotion of public health, and the advancement of medical knowledge. I will practice my profession conscientiously, with dignity and in keeping with the principles of veterinary medical ethics. I accept as a lifelong obligation, the continual improvement of my professional knowledge and competence”.

Molly’s last hours must have been horrific, and at the very least a veterinarian could have ended her suffering.

Mr Riley, already grieving for family members and battling depression, would surely have paid the $200 required for that as soon as he could.

It is to be hoped that Tasmania Police will treat this obscene crime with the seriousness it deserves.

Suzanne Cass, Stop Tasmanian Animal Cruelty, Bridgewater

SickeningIt is sickening that such a thing could happen to a puppy, or for that matter, any animal.

What is worse is that no help was obtained because the owner had not the funds to pay at that moment.Very sad indeed.

Bunty Jackson, Penguin

BelongingThere are many situations where children grow up being denied knowledge of one or both their biological parents.

Many of these children experience inner turmoil through a sense of not belonging and not having identity, and when older go to great lengths to trace their parentage.They “search for their roots.”

We have a moral responsibility put children’s interests foremost.

Social science upholds that children do best when raised by their mother and father wherever possible.

For the children’s sake, we should uphold and protect “the most basic institution of civilisation – the monogamous covenantal union of a man and woman.”

The extension of reproductive technologies and adoption (where degrees of anonymity can apply) to homosexual couples will introduce confusion into these children’s lives and deny the basic right to be raised by their biological parents.

Many of these children will say too, “I don’t belong here.”We may well repeat history and have to say, “Who will apologise for this stolen generation?”

Alan Lee, Turners Beach

Dividend release neededIt is time TasWater is released from the shackles of the state’s 29 councils expecting unsustainable dividends. In 2012/13 $18.6m and 2013/14 $22.1m was paid in dividends to councils, this is while Tasmanian communities are living in Third World conditions.

State Government could pass legislation to buy out the council’s shareholdings and reduce TasWater dividends for a period of time to accelerate infrastructure upgrades, the $22.1m paid in dividends last year would have gone a long way to upgrading infrastructure for the boiled water woes.

An example of reduced dividends is in 2015/2016 BHP’s 76 per cent reduction in dividends.Councils have to become smarter with their budgets and operate like public companies not just expecthandouts.

Peter Cooper, Bonnet Hill

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Temperature rising over future hosting of Olympics

The Rio Olympic Games will no doubt be remembered for its stories of individual triumph.
Nanjing Night Net

Mack Horton seizing Australia’s first gold, and Michael Phelps finishing his career with 23 gold medals are already the stuff of sporting legend.

But for me Rio’s greatest accomplishment was away from the sporting field. Brazil’s decision to use the opening ceremony to alert sports loversof all cultures and faithsto the threat of climate change is proof humanity is awakening to the need for urgent action.

Brazil, like Australia, is feeling the heat. Our rural and regional communities are disproportionately affected by climate change due to worsening heatwaves, droughts, and bushfires.

If we continue on our current path, by the end of the century climate change will generate unprecedented social disorganisation, conflict, and famine that will harm billions of people.

A New Zealand study has found most cities will be too hot to host Summer Olympics within decades. Canadian researchers say if we fail to limit carbon pollution, two in three cities that previously hosted Winter Olympics will not be cold enough to do it again.

What’soften overlooked is how important religion is for many athletes, like US gymnastSimone Biles, to achieve the ‘impossible’. Faith, like the Olympics, can also inspire hope and unite communities to tackle climate change.

With four in five Australians identifying as religious, faith groups and people of conscience must work together to break the record most critical to the well-being of our children, and ensuring the Olympics are run well into the future – a rapid transition to 100% renewable energy.

Jody Lightfoot, climate change lead at Christian justice group, Common Grace, and Dr Colin Butler, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Contributor and co-founder of BODHI Australia

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.