Lort Smith Animal Hospital needs almost $500,000 for adoption centre vet care

Who’s a pretty Polly: Lort Smith Animal Hospital needs to raise almost $500,000 for vet care for surrendered animals like cockatiel Polly (pictured on the shoulder of animal welfare officer Lisa Varrasso) that it puts up for adoption. Photo: Pat Scala Who’s a pretty Polly: Lort Smith Animal Hospital needs to raise almost $500,000 for vet care for surrendered animals like cockatiel Polly that it puts up for adoption. Photo: Pat Scala
Nanjing Night Net

Australia’s largest not-for-profit animal hospital says it needs to raise almost $500,000 before the end of the year to keep afloat its veterinary service for surrendered animals.

As the Lort Smith Animal Hospital launches its latest appeal, chief executive David Herman said more than $750,000 was spent each year on caring for creatures great and small in its adoption centre.

There was a shortfall of $495,000 to raise before the end of the calendar year.

Asked if the centre, part of the hospital which turns 80 this year, was in crisis, he said, “Our need to continue to raise funds is always to some degree a crisis because we don’t get any other funding.

“So we are reliant on the public to make sure we can continue to do what we do.”

Animals put up for adoption at the North Melbourne hospital have all been surrendered by people who are unable to care for them. Mr Herman said most animals “need some form of veterinary care and rehabilitation”.

Among current adoption candidates are a cockatiel called Polly, and a canary called Little Man. Polly (pictured) will be available in the next week after vet checks and observation.

Mr Herman said Lort Smith receives only about 30 birds a year, including budgerigars, canaries, cockatiels, the occasional cockatoo, chickens, ducks and geese.

Although cats and dogs are the most common creatures to pass through its doors, Lort Smith has also adopted out mice, rabbits, guinea pigs and several years ago a bearded dragon that had lost limbs.

Mr Herman said Lort Smith’s more than 60 vets and 80 nurses annually care for about 25,000 animals and perform 40,000 consultations. More than 50 per cent of human customers need some sort of subsidy for vet bills.

“In 2015 Lort Smith placed 1024 homeless animals in loving forever homes,” Mr Herman said.

“We strongly encourage all pet owners to desex their animals to avoid overpopulation and subsequent abandonment.”

He said those looking for a new pet should “take a look at the Lort Smith website to view the many gorgeous animals currently looking for a permanent home”.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

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